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Prolonged exposure to the sun can cause more than just the discomfort of a sunburn; it can also result in leathery skin, dark spots, and even premature aging. According to the American Cancer Society, one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 70, and the likelihood of developing the disease is significantly increased by having even one serious sunburn. The sun’s rays are stronger and the air is more humid when temperatures rise. Even though it’s the most delightful time of the year, sunburns may be devastating if you aren’t careful.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have published recommendations for skin protection for the continuous hot weather such as the one in Malaysia. Seek professional help if you experience any alarming signs of sun harm.

Make advantage of shade and sunscreen

The FDA recommends that people apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen (one that protects against both UVA and UVB radiation) with an SPF of at least 30 whenever they go outside. A good physical sunscreen should have zinc oxide as its main ingredient. You may still get sunburn if you swim, perspire heavily, or spend even a few hours outside without reapplying. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends providing shade for babies during the midday hours.

Headwear

Use a wide-brimmed hat to shield your face, ears, and neck from the sun. For maximum defense against harmful ultraviolet radiation, use canvas or another closely woven fabric. Straw hats with holes that let sunlight in should be avoided. Sun protection may be increased while wearing a dark hat.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should additionally cover your ears and the back of your neck with clothes, use sunscreen, or seek shade. For Muslims, wearing hijab may do the same trick as wearing other protective headwear.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses shield your eyes from damaging sunlight and help prevent cataracts. Furthermore, they shield the delicate skin around your eyes from harmful UV rays.

The most effective protection comes from sunglasses that filter out both UVA and UVB radiation. In Malaysia, this criteria is met by the vast majority of sunglasses sold at any price point, so you don’t have to worry about getting the most expensive sunglasses out there. In order to prevent any UV light from entering the eyes from the sides, wrap-around sunglasses are ideal.

Wear proper attire

Always wear well-covered clothing. In addition to sunscreen, wearing protective clothes can shield your scalp, eyes, ears, and other sensitive areas from the sun’s rays. In addition to seeking shade, you may protect yourself from the sun by donning a hat, sunglasses, and long-sleeved clothes.

Tightly knit textiles, such as those seen in protective garments, are optimal. Find things that have been tested and proven to protect you from the sun’s rays. If you want to avoid sun damage to your face, hair, and shoulders, a hat with a broad brim is a good idea.

Keep out of the direct sunlight for extended periods of time

Long period of time spent in the sun are not advised, even while wearing protective clothing. Premature aging and skin cancer can be avoided by avoiding direct sun exposure and instead seeking shelter under an umbrella, a tree, or some other kind of shade. Even in the shade, some of the sun’s UV rays may reach you, therefore sunscreen is a must.

Stay out of the tanning booths too. The American Academy of Dermatology reports a 20% increase in skin cancer risk for each indoor tanning session. You may acquire a natural glow by using one of several self-tanning lotions designed for regular use, or you can visit a spa for a professional spray tan.

Shade

Staying in the shade of an umbrella, tree, or other object can help protect your skin against sunburn and some forms of skin cancer. Even if you’re in the shade, your skin can still be damaged by the sun, so it’s important to take precautions.